Your microbiome is acquired at birth

The microbiome describes the bacterial, fungal and viral communities which live on or in us. The low diversity and dominance of certain bacteria in our gut is known as dysbiosis and is linked to various diseases, including C. difficile infections, cancers, diabetes, allergies and obesity.

 

At birth, microbes are passed from mothers to their infants, colonising the gut with 'good bacteria'. This first infant microbiome is known to be critical for short and long-term health. 

If an infant is born naturally, they are colonised from their mother's vaginal and gut microbiome. But if an infant is born by C-section, they are colonised from bacteria in the environment and from surgical equipment. 

After birth, breast milk provides the next bacterial flux, with >200 bacterial species known to be critical for microbiome development.

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The infant microbiome is key to developing a healthy future.

At birth, microbes are passed from mothers to their infants, colonising the gut with 'good bacteria'. This first infant microbiome is known to be critical for short and long-term health. 

If an infant is born naturally, they are colonised from their mother's vaginal and gut microbiome. But if an infant is born by C-section, they are colonised from bacteria in the environment and from surgical equipment. 

After birth, breast milk provides the next bacterial flux, with >200 bacterial species known to be critical for developing the immune system and off-setting disease. 

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The infant microbiome is key to developing a healthy future.

At birth, microbes are passed from mothers to their infants, colonising the gut with 'good bacteria'. This first infant microbiome is known to be critical for short and long-term health. 

If an infant is born naturally, they are colonised from their mother's vaginal and gut microbiome. But if an infant is born by C-section, they are colonised from bacteria in the environment and from surgical equipment. 

After birth, breast milk provides the next bacterial flux, with >200 bacterial species known to be critical for developing the immune system and off-setting disease.